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Showing posts from April, 2020

Central School to Chehalem Cultural Center: Part Two

By Barbara Doyle This is part two of a multi-part series on the history of Central School, look for new installments in the weeks to come! This and future installments in this series are adapted from Barbara Doyle's book on this topic: From Then 'till Now: Schooling in Newberg, Oregon. Part One Part Three Part Four Part Five Part Six Part Seven Newberg didn’t get a new school. The community got an enlarged school. The site purchased in 1889 covered a bit more than three acres – that’s plenty of room to expand the existing school. The 1892 plan included raising the building three and a half feet providing basement space for a furnace and a foundation for a four room addition. But only two of those rooms were used initially. Student population continued to rise reaching more than four hundred in 1893. Then the economic depression labeled the ‘Panic of 1893' struck. Student attendance dropped off – families left town and some students ignored mandatory attend

Central School to Chehalem Cultural Center: Part One

By Barbara Doyle This is part one of a multi-part series on the history of Central School, look for new installments in the weeks to come! This and future installments in this series are adapted from Barbara Doyle's book on this topic: From Then 'till Now: Schooling in Newberg, Oregon . Part Two Part Three Part Four Part Five Part Six Part Seven Newberg Oregon was just like many other small towns in late nineteenth century America.  We had a one-room wooden schoolhouse with students that could vary between five and twenty years of age – with just one teacher. Erected in 1881, the building was located at the Northeast corner of Main and Illinois streets. Initially thirteen students attended this ungraded public school. Students progressed individually thru the educational program. Good spelling and penmanship plus competence in simple arithmetic and understanding the words and ideas in Readers [numbered 1-6] was often the equivalent of an eighth grade education. This buildi

The Precedent for Unprecedented Times Part 2: The Spanish Flu and George Fox University

By Rachel Thomas Part 1: The Spanish Influenza and Newberg When the Spanish Influenza epidemic hit Newberg in 1918, it’s effects on Pacific College (now known as George Fox University) were severe. The 1918-1919 school year had already begun with a two week delay so that students could assist in harvesting the local prune crop. Labor was scarce because of WWI. Once classes began at the beginning of October 1918, they were held for four weeks, before Pacific College closed for most of the month of November. Towards the end of November, classes resumed, but were closed again by December 24th. The college hoped to reopen by the 30th of December, but this was not to be the case. The college finally opened again on February 27, 1919. The college had been closed for nine weeks of scheduled class time, and many students had lost additional time due to personal illness and quarantine, frequently referred to as “enforced flu vacations.” While the college was cl

The Precedent for Unprecedented Times: The Spanish Flu in Newberg 1918-1919

by Rachel Thomas Ch eck out Part 2: The Spanish Flu and Pacific College/George Fox University! Note: Clippings in this article are from the Newberg Graphic which can be accessed through the  University of Oregon   Historic Oregon Newspapers project .  Newberg Graphic, October 17, 1918. In the winter of 1918-1919 an epidemic swept the globe. The Spanish Influenza as it was called, arrived in the last few months of World War I. In Newberg, schools were closed, public gatherings were cancelled, and many fell ill. Newberg Graphic, January 9, 1919. Spain protested the moniker "Spanish Flu" - it was not theirs! News from London, New York, and other major cities spoke of a major epidemic. The Newberg Graphic published articles answering questions on symptoms of influenza, how to care for oneself, and the importance of avoiding gatherings. Outdoor exercise was recommended. Newberg Graphic, October 17, 1918. Newberg Graphic, October 10, 1918 Advice gi