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Showing posts from May, 2020

Central School to Chehalem Cultural Center: Part Four

By Barbara Doyle This is part four of a multi-part series on the history of Central School, look for new installments in the weeks to come! Installments in this series are adapted from Barbara Doyle's book on this topic: From Then 'till Now: Schooling in Newberg, Oregon. Part One Part Two Part Three Part Five Part Six Part Seven Part 4 - A New Building The 1932-33 school year began just like the previous one – short on cash,  struggling financially in the Great Depression.  But the long view was more promising. In early 1933, Franklin Delano Roosevelt was elected president and his new Democratic government promised financial help. Newberg went for a $50,000 project – a new grade school – with residents taking on $35,000 bonded indebtedness and the federal government providing a $15,000 grant. The least costly plan was to build right on the existing site. The project moved forward – slowly. Thursday, January 24, 1935 was the last day of classes in the old school that

The Mysterious “E. Wright”

By Chuck Zickefoose Why mysterious?  His name shows or has shown up on sidewalks around Newberg.  The sidewalk faces have a distinctive white paint-like appearance not seen on other walks in town.  Also he is associated with two “Union Block” buildings, one in McMinnville, the other in Newberg.  It is supposed that the “E” in his name stood for either Elsia or Elza according to Polk’s Directory of 1912-13 for McMinnville, Oregon.  His occupation is listed as a cement worker.  Other sources name him as a contractor building sidewalks in McMinnville as well as a harness maker. There are three sections of sidewalks in Newberg that are presumed to have been laid by Wright, these are: West side of S. College St south of First St West side of Blaine, E. Sheridan and south on Washington West side of Main St. north of Hancock to Franklin St. The distinctive markings are evident on each of the above stretches of sidewalk: Sheridan and Washington Sts. West side of S.

Central School to Chehalem Cultural Center: Part Three

By Barbara Doyle This is part three of a multi-part series on the history of Central School, look for new installments in the weeks to come! This and future installments in this series are adapted from Barbara Doyle's book on this topic: From Then 'till Now: Schooling in Newberg, Oregon. Part One Part Two Part Four Part Five Part Six Part Seven Part Three – Good Times to Hard Times The new building had space for the principal’s office, a library and high school grades 9-11. The large basement could be used for recess time activities. The furnace wasn’t capable of heating sixteen rooms and long hallways; it was replaced. But some first and second graders still had classes in three separate rooms at the Creamery. Newberg experienced tremendous growth in the first decade of the 20th century. Perhaps the newcomers brought new ideas – high school, library, City Hall, bridge across the Willamette River, commuter train service to Portland. The three buildings were constructed